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About Import Radios

Just any other questions that you don't see a forum for. Go ahead and post here.

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About Import Radios

Post by Brass Monkey » Monday, 02 November 2015, 23:23 PM

If that's the correct term for them. First off let me say that besides having Radio Shack and Cobra CB's since I was a teenager, I have also been a Ham radio operator with a General Class License for the last 16 years.

I used to have a President HR2510 and know what the Yeticom Optima and Magnum 257 are along with the Radio Shack HTX-10 and 100's. What I have never figured out is what these CB radio-looking rigs are that are called 10 meter.

If they are 10 meter rigs then how do you select the frequencies? All I see is a knob that looks like the selector switch on any CB rig.

Can someone give me the lowdown on these rigs or maybe a link. For some reason this is a touchy or taboo subject with Ham operators who seem to go ballistic if you even mention them. All I can figure out is the whole controversy seems to be with the amount of power they transmit.

Really what I'd like to know is how you operate them - That's all.


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Re: About Import Radios

Post by halfwatt959 » Tuesday, 03 November 2015, 2:56 AM

Ive heard them called "import" and "export" radios. I myself consider them to be conversion radios. Because you have to "convert" them for 11m cb band. After the conversion process they are still capable of transmiting and recieveing on some of the 10m band. Unlicensed cb'ers have been known to stray on to 10m and cause problems with bleed over ect.Which upsets the licensed amature opperators. technicaly they are only "legal" for sale in the US as 10m ammature rigs. As for the rest that just goes into the gap between hams and cb'ers which I still dont understand after all its all radio. How crowded would it be if we all were on one band?
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Re: About Import Radios

Post by 543FtWorth » Tuesday, 03 November 2015, 6:03 AM

They van be operated on the ham bands but without a VFO scanning the band can be tricky. You just use the channel selector to scan around and the clarifier for fine tuning. There should be a band switch with a,b,c,d,e.... each one of those bands is a different set of 40 channels. Stryker has "VFO mode" on the 955 but it's a joke. If you want to work HF I'd buy a real HF rig and leave these to the CB operators.

They were designed with CB radio in mind but they are not FCC approved. They all exceed legal power, come equipped with echo and noise makers, and many throw spurs on the 10 meter band while being used on 11. To get around the red tape they are sold as a 10 meter radio and do not cover 11 meters out of the box. The conversion is usually something simple like removing a resistor.

Some hams get bent out of shape by anything a CBer does that's illegal. Some don't like them because of the people that operate out of band and interfere with the amateur bands. These exports are now covering a wider and wider frequency range. I heard some truckers talking on 12 meters a few weeks ago.

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Re: About Import Radios

Post by silvereagle1 » Tuesday, 03 November 2015, 21:18 PM

If you want to feel like a freshman in high school post a picture of an export on one of the "serious" ham sites. better yet start a topic on 10 meter radios and set back and watch the daggers start flying. The Sharks will smell the blood in the water. I didn't post a pic nor did I start a topic but I did read through post from some of the new hams. They didn't know any better they were new just posting pics of their new 10 meter radios. I too was new myself that's why I browsed the topics. Don't get me wrong Some of the hams would answer questions and "Elmer" but they are some that just stay in attack mode no matter what. if it has a 2 channel display its on the most hated list. In all fairness to the ones who hate the 10 meter exports I have a more understanding now why they hate them so bad whereas I didnt understand before. I don't use my Lincoln 2 on 10 meters any longer. 28.300 on the Lincoln 2 is on "D" I believe and 28.400 is on "F" impossible to utilize in scan mode because you can only scan one band letter at a time. 28.300-28.500 is on 2 different band letters. I found that the tuning on my Lincoln 2 doesn't tune the stations in sharp like the radio shack 10 meter rig does. It's a world of difference. I'm guessing that the transmission is the same as well. Just my own observation
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Re: About Import Radios

Post by Brass Monkey » Thursday, 05 November 2015, 13:19 PM

Thanks to all of you for the clarification. My thing is that I just didn't know how they operated but you guys have answered that question.

My main HF rig is a Yaesu 840, a very simple but coveted older radio. It can't transmit on 6 meter but I can get all the other bands from 10-160.

I think all forums have their resident "heroes" on them but there are some of those guys that go bonkers if you even reference anything about 11 meter, even if it's for technical reasons or your trying to compare something as simple as signal propagation or whatever.

Those Hams that complain have no business saying anything about CB'ers. A lot of them in their minds think 11 meters is below them. You should hear a lot of the garbage that goes on in the 40 meter and 75/80 meter bands. I'm in Central California and right smack in the middle of a feud between several hams, some in SoCal and others up in Northern California. It' really bad, they cuss and threaten each all the time. There's even a name for the frequencies, it's called the "War Zone" by other hams. For some reason the FCC won't do anything to stop it. Unfortunately for me the signals don't skip over me and they come hammering into my rig when I scan anywhere near them.

Thanks again.


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Re: About Import Radios

Post by TheCBDoctor » Monday, 14 December 2015, 12:59 PM

Brass Monkey wrote:If that's the correct term for them. First off let me say that besides having Radio Shack and Cobra CB's since I was a teenager, I have also been a Ham radio operator with a General Class License for the last 16 years.

I used to have a President HR2510 and know what the Yeticom Optima and Magnum 257 are along with the Radio Shack HTX-10 and 100's. What I have never figured out is what these CB radio-looking rigs are that are called 10 meter.

If they are 10 meter rigs then how do you select the frequencies? All I see is a knob that looks like the selector switch on any CB rig.

Can someone give me the lowdown on these rigs or maybe a link. For some reason this is a touchy or taboo subject with Ham operators who seem to go ballistic if you even mention them. All I can figure out is the whole controversy seems to be with the amount of power they transmit.

Really what I'd like to know is how you operate them - That's all.
Hi Brass Monkey,

The "Export" radio market is what killed the domestic radio market. They are not type accepted, so they are not legal even as 10 meter radios. Technically, a Ham operator may use an Export radio as an experimental station just as it is legal to build your own 10 meter rig. The Ham operator is still bound by the regulations for 10 meter and is not to be used in the CB band. I suppose if you limit the carrier to 4 watts with a 12 watt peak to peak no one will bother you if you have a Ham ticket, but no self respecting Ham operator will admit having or using one. The same goes for amplifiers, it is legal for a Ham operator to possess or build an amp for 10 meters as long as it complies with emission spurs and does not splatter.

Ham operators are a funny gang. I used to have a Ham license when code was required. I let it lapse. I never liked the idea that you can put a Ham call sign in a google search engine and your name, address and what your prior call signs were.

Legally I may repair Ham equipment, but I am not allowed to transmit on an antenna; I must use a dummy load. I had a gentlemen once tell me that I was not allowed to repair Ham equipment. I explained that I was allowed I just could not transmit over the airwaves. He replied, "What good is that?" I told him that if I needed a call sign I would just use his......needless to say he went ballistic. He told me that if I ever used his call sign he was going to do all sorts of things like turn me in. I had to laugh and assured him that I had no need to talk on Ham radio because if I wanted to do something as boring as talk on the Ham band I could just as easily go outside and watch the grass grow. (Your not allowed to talk politics or religion.......or anything worth talking about on Ham radio.) you are allowed to talk about.......well ham radio and computers. You are also allowed to use your equipment for emergencies and patching into military Ham stations, so military personnel can talk to their loved ones, but with the introduction of cell phones and satellite phones that purpose is slowly dying.

The radio of choice for me is the HR-2510, which is a true 10 meter radio that was easily converted for use from 26.000 MHz to 29.9999 MHz on the first generation and up to 29.6999 on the following generation 2510s. Eventually the FCC caught on and had Uniden use a Microprocessor that could not be converted. The distributors unloaded these radios by including the 64 pin Microprocessor that could be converted. The last one off the assembly line was April 1994.

Do I like "Export Radio?s".........No I do not. Back in the day one could make a lot of money "doing up" a Cobra 29 LTD. It was the export radios that killed the domestic market by including all the illegal bells and whistles. This caused the price and the quality of the Cobra 29 LTD to go down hill.

http://thecbdoctor.net/_mgxroot/page_10823.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; Photos of the HR-2510

http://thecbdoctor.net/_mgxroot/page_10829.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; Some info

Some links to my educational website

Respectfully as always,

The CB Doctor

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Re: About Import Radios

Post by Bman » Saturday, 09 January 2016, 11:10 AM

I have a few of the export radios . Yes they do put out more power. Some do not have to be modded as they come ready for 11 meters with just a push of a couple of buttons such as my Intek HR 5500 and have a 40 watt power rating. My 148DX came ready to go right out of the box had a band switch installed at the factory. But I will say one thing export radios are not made for Ham operators they have no DTMF options to key repeaters. Bman/Dave


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